Advanced Studies in Poetry: Global Haiku Tradition
IN203 Humanities Honors Seminar - Spring 2013
Dr. Randy Brooks

Millikin University
Shilling 209
rbrooks@millikin.edu

Global Haiku Tradition Assignments Blog - Spring 2013

ALL ASSIGNMENTS are to be submitted by email.
Send them to: rbrooks@millikin.edu

Classroom: Mac Lab (Staley Library 14)

*Informal Reader Response Writing & Haiku Writing = 25%
*Contemporary Haiku Study (due April 4) = 20%
*Haiku Comparison Team Presentation = 10%
*Kasen Renga = 10%
*Haiku Project = 10%
*Haiku Collection (paper & by email) = 15%
 Submission Ready (in envelopes) = 05%
 Final Reading & Signature Gift Haiku = 05%

Final Exam: May 14, 10:30-12:30 in the Fireplace Room, RTUC


Haiku Community Links:

Several blogs provide updates on events & news in the contemporary haiku community. The links:

Aubrie Cox - http://yaywords.wordpress.com/
Curtis Dunlap - http://tobaccoroadpoet.blogspot.com/
Melissa Allen - http://haikuproject.wordpress.com/

Also, additional excellent sources of learning more about the contemporary haiku community is through the following links:

Haiku Society of America • http://www.hsa-haiku.org/
American Haiku Archives • http://www.americanhaikuarchives.org/
Haiku Chronicles • http://www.haikuchronicles.com/
The Haiku Foundation • http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/
Simply Haiku • http://www.simplyhaiku.com
Heron's Nest • http://www.theheronsnest.com/
Modern Haiku • http://www.modernhaiku.org/
A Hundred Gourds • http://ahundredgourds.com
World Kigo Database • http://worldkigodatabase.blogspot.com/
Haibun Today • http://haibuntoday.com/


Extra Credit Opportunities:

(1) Japan House Tea Ceremonies

Japan House is delighted to announce that tea ceremonies will now be offered to the public on the third Saturday of each month at 3:00 p.m. Tea ceremonies will continue to be offered every Thursday at 2:00 and 3:00 but due to many requests we are adding these monthly Saturday teas on the third Saturday of each month to accommodate those that aren't able to attend during the week. Please join us and find a moment of peace as you experience the Way of Tea.

Saturday, April 13, 2013 - Japan House Spring Open House & tea ceremony - 10am to 4pm

(2) Haiku Poetry Reading

Bronze Man Books is hosting a "Broken Hearts" poetry reading on Valentine's Day, February 14, Thursday at the SPEC at 7pm. If you go & participate (you can write up your experience in an email to me for extra credit.

(3) Undergraduate Haiku Award Competition - deadline April 15, 2013

The Myong Cha Son Haiku Award welcomes unpublished, original haiku for consideration in the competition. We ask that applicants adhere to the following guidelines. The annual competition is open to all undergraduate poets who are enrolled in a college/university in the United States. The submission should consist of a cover letter and up to three poems. Please put only the title of the poem at the top of the manuscript. The author's name, address, e-mail address, and telephone number should be placed on a separate sheet. There is a $10 entry fee for submission of up to three poems. Make payment to: WCU Foundation. All submissions must be postmarked no later than April 15, 2013. Submitted poems will not be returned. For notification of contest results please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope.Manuscripts should be sent to:

Iris N. Spencer Undergraduate Poetry Awards
Poetry House
West Chester University
West Chester, PA 19383

The winner will receive a $1500 award and the runner-up will receive $500.

(4) Night of Poetry Reading

Bronze Man Books and the Decatur Area Arts Council are co-hosting a communitiy poetry reading on Thursday, April 18, at 6:30 pm. This is downtown at the Decatur Area Arts Council next to Millikin's Blue Connection. If you go, you can write a response to your experience in an email to me for extra credit.

(5) Haiku Cut Competition

Celebrations of Scholarship - 3-5pm - Pilling Chapel, April 26, 2013

Bring your best haiku on a sheet of paper or on cards. This is a slam-style competition in public tournament style. To become Grand Champion, your team will have up to at least 25 winning haiku, so bring plenty of haiku to the competition. Here are possible slam round topics: certain Japanese aesthetics such as sabi, wabi, aware, karumi, and yugen. There will also be American aesthetics rounds such as first date, graduation, awkwardness, spring break, grooviness, April fool's, peace, love, old jeans, summer vacation and angst.

Extra credit for competing or attending. Write an email response to the event after the fact.

 


Kukai Favorite Selections

Kukai 1Kukai 1 favorites

Kukai 2 Kukai 2 favorites

Haiku to Edit 1 Haiku to Edit Results

Kukai 3 Kukai 3 favorites

Matching Contest 1- Love Haiku
Matching Contest 1 - Love Haiku Results

Matching Contest 2 - Donuts
Matching Contest 2 - Donuts Results

Kukai 4 Kukai 4 favorites

Kukai 5Kukai 5 favorites

Matching Contest 3 - Mido
Matching Contest 3 - Mido Results

Matching Contest 4 - Kuro
Matching Contest 4 - Kuro Results

Tan-renga 1Tan-renga 1 favorites

Kukai 6Kukai 6 favorites

Kukai 7Kukai 7 favorites

Kukai 8 - Final Kukai
Kukai 8 - Final Kukai Favorites


Reading & Writing Assignments by Dates:

for 1/24 - haiku of the day --> Courtney

reading: Mayfly magazine sample

writing response: send me an email copy of your in-class response to a favorite haiku in MAYFLY 48 and select 2 favorite haiku (from MAYFLY or Peggy Lyles) and briefly write your imagined, felt response to them. be ready to discuss why you like them

haiku writing: write your first 3-5 haiku attempts on transition times—lulls of dawn, of dusk, of relationships, of states of consciousness, of between semesters). (email your 3 responses & 3-5 haiku by midnight Wednesday, 1/23)


for 1/29 - haiku of the day --> Alex

reading: To Hear the Rain, pages 1-64, introductions, prose (and the interview in the back of the book)

writing response: find 3 favorite Lyles haiku—write your imagined felt responses to them (one paragraph each)

writing extended memory & memory haiku: then go into more depth with a fourth haiku that especially triggered memories from your childhood or past (about a one page memoir) describing a memory from your own life. THEN write 3-5 haiku which capture different moments or feelings from within that longer memory from your experience. You may want to especially explore a childhood memory as well as more recent memories.

haiku write: 5-10 haiku on the coldness (not ABOUT the cold but about a moment of encountering the cold—cold wind, cold walk, cold hands, the flu, cold car, chill).

(email your 3 short responses & one 1-page sensory memory writing & 7-10 new haiku by midnight Sunday, 1/27)


for 1/31 - haiku of the day --> Charlie

reading: To Hear the Rain, pages 65-end (read the interview at the back)

haiku reading responses: write a response to 1 favorite haiku from Kukai 1

haiku reading responses: select 3 more favorite haiku by Peggy Lyles and briefly write your imagined, felt response to them. be ready to discuss why you like them.

REMEMBER to cite each haiku fully (do not add capital letters or punctuation) like this:

cucumbers
soaked in vinegar—
the heat

          Lyles, THTR, 48

haiku write: 4-5 haiku on perceptions of snow, ice, or frost.

(email your 4 responses & 5 haiku by midnight Wednesday, 1/30)


for 2/5 - haiku of the day --> Darien

reading: handout of haiku from Almost Unseen by George Swede (available from Moodle)

writing response 1: find two favorite haiku from the handout and write a short response paragraph to one of them AND write a longer memory response with 3-5 new haiku to a third favorite haiku by George Swede. (email your 1 response paragraph and 1 memory response with 3-5 new haiku to me by midnight, Sunday, 2/3)

reading response 2: find an interesting "matched pair" of haiku (one from George Swede and one from Peggy Lyles or a Mayfly author) to read side by side. write a short analysis of the writing strategies and techniquse used in these haiku. (not reader response but analysis of writing techniques such as line break, word choice, arrangement, rhythm, sounds, emphasis, break, voice, tone, attitude, etc.). one page maximum for your analysis (half a page is fine).

reading response 3: write your imagined felt responses to your favorite haiku from kukai 1 (one paragraph)

haiku write: 4-5 haiku on the nitty gritty side of college life and the angst of being human — like some of George's haiku. Due by email Sunday, February 3.

IN CLASS - bring your extended memory writing from Lyles & be ready for an editing workshop. haiku to edit workshop

editing haiku: read each other's memory writing & resulting haiku. select your favorite one by the team member and offer a couple of edits or variations of another couple haiku.


for 2/7 - haiku of the day --> Molly

editing haiku: based on the haiku editing workshop in class on Tuesday, send me variations and edit suggestions for at least two of your haiku from the extended memory writing.

reading response 1: compare the genesis of discourse for your two authors (George Swede and Peggy Lyles). why do they choose to write haiku about these moments? what is the source of significance worth turning into a literary artwork for them? (Short, informal writing, no more than 1 page.)

writing response to Kukai 2: write your imagined felt responses to your 1 favorite haiku from Kukai 2 (one paragraph)

haiku writing: 3-6 new haiku on any topic you choose


for 2/12 - haiku of the day --> Randi

reading: Love Haiku by Masajo Suzuki, Introduction and haiku from pages 1-64

reading responses: find three favorite haiku by Masajo and write a short response paragraph to them. (email your 3 response paragraphs to me by midnight Sunday Feb. 10)

editing haiku: send variations & edited haiku from our Haiku to Edit 1 session in class.

writing love haiku or senryu: write 6-10 love/Valentine's Day haiku. Not necessarily all lovey-dovey cliches, but love, lust, crushes, unrequited love, good friends, bitterness about love, winter dance, sock hop, blind date, romance, vampire love, and so on . . . Send your Valentine's Day haiku to Dr. Brooks by midnight, Sunday Feb. 10.


for 2/14 - haiku of the day --> Kelsey

kukai responses: write about a favorite match or pair of haiku that came up in the Matching Contest 1 - Love Haiku

reading: Love Haiku by Masajo Suzuki, haiku from pages 64-128

reading responses: find two favorite haiku by Masajo and write a short response paragraph to both of them. (email your 2 response paragraphs to me by midnight Wednesday Feb. 13)

writing love haiku or senryu: write another 4-6 haiku on Fat Tuesday, Mardi Gras, Ash Wednesday or Valentine's Day

Extra Credit Opportunity: Bronze Man Books is hosting a "Broken Hearts" poetry reading on Valentine's Day, February 14, Thursday at the SPEC at 7pm. If you go & participate (you can write up your experience in an email to me for extra credit.


for 2/19 - haiku of the day --> Emily C.

reading & DVD viewing: Haiku: The Art of the Short Poem, pages 1-88 (whole book).

Invite some friends or classmates over to watch the DVD video included in the back cover of this book. The haiku cited by the haiku poets are included in the anthology, in the same order as the DVD.

reader response 1: write response paragraphs for two favorite haiku from Haiku: The Art of the Short Poem

reader response 2: write a response about what you realized about the English-langauge haiku poetry community from the video. also briefly discuss one or two or the haiku poets who especially intrigued you

writing haiku: open topic 6-10 new haiku

email your responses and haiku by midnight Sunday, February 17


for 2/21 - haiku of the day -->Emily D.

reading: The Haiku Anthology, pages 1-60 including the introductions. select 3 favorites and write a paragraph response to 2 favorite haiku and a full page memory response to 1 haiku ending with 2-3 new haiku by you. send your response writing to me by email by midnight Wednesday, Feb. 20.

writing haiku: instead of written responses to another 2 haiku from the Haiku Anthology, just write haiku in response to 2 more favorite haiku


for 2/26 - haiku of the day --> Jordan

reading: The Haiku Anthology, pages 60-157. select 3 favorites and write a paragraph response to 2 favorite haiku and write a haiku technique analysis to 1 favorite.

writing haiku: instead of written responses to another 2 haiku from the Haiku Anthology, just write a couple of haiku in response to 2 more favorite haiku

writing response to Kukai 3: write your imagined felt responses to your 1 favorite haiku from Kukai 3. (one paragraph)

writing haiku: 2-3 haiku about donuts of any type

send me your three paragraphs by email by midnight Sunday, February 24)


for 2/28 - haiku of the day --> Heidi

reading: The Haiku Anthology, pages 158-327. select 5 favorites and write a paragraph response to 2 favorite haiku and an extended memory response to 1 favorite (ending with 2-3 haiku from your memory).

kukai responses: write about a favorite match or pair of haiku that came up in Matching Contest 2 - Donuts Results

writing haiku: 3-5 haiku about decisions or decision making or bad decisions or choices . . .

send me your two paragraphs and extended memory haiku & favorite pair of dounts by email by midnight Wednesday, February 27.


for 3/5 - haiku of the day --> Sarah

comparison presentations / activities

Team 1: Sarah, Kenny, Jon, Emily D, and Matt - haiku & visual art

Team 2: Heidi, Randi, Courtney, and Alex - haiku & the missing piece

Team 3: Darien, Molly, Kelsey, Charlie, and Emily - haiku & Hemingway's "Six Word Story"

Team 4: Amanda, Therese, and Jordan - haiku & the missing piece

in class group team dialogue on 2/28: what are the essential elements of the very best haiku? What makes some haiku better than others? How would you define or describe the characteristics of the best haiku? What must a highest-quality haiku do (for? with?) for readers to be effective?

genre n 1: a kind of literary or artistic work 2: a style of expressing yourself in writing [syn: writing style, literary genre] 3: a class of artistic endeavor having a characteristic form or technique. (dictionary.com)

literary genre n : a style of expressing yourself in writing [syn: writing style, genre] (dictionary.com)

genre (zhän`r?), in art-history terminology, a type of painting dealing with unidealized scenes and subjects of everyday life. Although practiced in ancient art, as shown by Pompeiian frescoes, and in the Middle Ages, genre was not recognized as worthy and independent subject matter until the 16th cent. in Flanders. There it was popularized by Pieter Bruegel, the elder. It flourished in Holland in the 17th cent. in the works of Ter Borch, Brouwer, Metsu, De Hooch, Vermeer, and many others, and extended to France and England, where in the 18th and 19th cent., its major practitioners were Watteau, Chardin, Greuze, Morland, and Wilkie. In Italy genre elements were present in Carpaccio's and Caravaggio's paintings, but not until the 18th cent. did genre become the specialty of an Italian artist, Pietro Longhi. The French impressionists often painted genre subjects as did members of the American ashcan school. (Columbia encyclopedia)

see Wikipedia for an introductory discussion of genre at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literary_genre

Definitions of genres, especially literary genres, usually includes some expectations of form or structure, so our next question is to consider the formal elements of haiku. But genres also include certain expectation of content and aesthetic experience.

team/partner comparisons presentations: Let me know what your group is planning to compare the art of haiku to and the gist of your interactive engagement on this comparison. Present your comparison of the art of haiku to another area or art of creative endeavor. DUE Sunday Midnight, March 3

writing haiku: 3-5 haiku related to elements (things, reality, settings, contexts) often associated with your comparison genre. Send me your 3-5 new haiku by midnight, Wednesday, March 5.

Send me your handouts of haiku examples and bullet point notes of your presentation by midnight, Wednesday, March 5. Presentations (powerpoint or handouts).

Be ready to make your presentation/experience comparing and contrasting haiku to another area. Include sample haiku and sample exhibits of the other things as well.


for 3/6 - haiku of the day --> Jon

kukai!

team results


for 3/12-3/14 - Spring Break!

Three assignments for Spring break:

(1) Take a break and enjoy being with friends, family and quiet time with yourself.

(2) haiku writing: write 10-20 haiku or a haiku sequence over Spring Break about your life's reality during spring break or about special locations and places of significance to you in your home town or travel. Don't write a bunch of cliches or stereotypical spring break stuff. Write from the reality of YOUR actual spring break.

email your spring break haiku by Sunday midnight, March 17. for our kukai!
Yes, spring break kukai will be Tuesday.


for 3/19 - haiku of the day --> Kenneth

Spring Break Kukai Kukai 5

email your spring break haiku by Sunday midnight, March 17. for our kukai!
Yes, spring break kukai will be Tuesday.

wedding photo haiku


for 3/21 - haiku of the day --> Amanda

(1) response writing: write about a favorite haiku from Spring Break Kukai Kukai 5

(2) Think about what or who you'd like to write about for your contemporary haiku reader response essay. You may want to browse the Registry of haiku poets at The Haiku Foundation <http://www.thehaikufoundation.org>. These essays are due April 2, about 2 weeks after Spring break. In order to loan you books from the Decatur Haiku Collection, I need to know your intended topic or author by Wednesday at midnight, March 20. Here's guidelines for this assignment:

haiku author or topic study: A formal essay introducing a particular contemporary author, topic or technical approach to contemporary haiku readers. This is a reader-response essay, so the primary source for your essay will be your own readings and analyses of 6-10 haiku. If you are doing an author focus, discuss your author's approach to writing haiku. You may choose to write about a haiku topic instead of an author, with reader responses to 6-10 haiku related to that topic. Matching comparisons with haiku by other authors are always valued in all approaches to this essay. This can focus on one book by the author in the form of a book review essay or on a particular theme or technical approach to haiku by the author.

o focus on a point of insight or question about that author’s unique contribution
o include response discussions of 6-10 haiku by the author
o include at least one matching comparison to a haiku by another author (or more)
o may include email or phone or in-person interview questions to help address the haiku writer's poetics

Length? 5-10 pages single-spaced. Citations? Full citation of each source within text first time mentioned (followed by haiku citation convention of author, publication title abbreviated, page number) for subsequent mentions. Yes, do include a works-cited page.

topic or author idea submitted to me by email by midnight, Wednesday, March 20 or sooner

Alex - uncertain times in love and relationships. I’d like to focus more on that topic

Amanda - George Swede

Charlie - Alan Pizzarelli

Courtney - technical formation of haiku (various approaches)

Darien - Barry George

Emily C. - George Swede

Emily D. - college student haiku

Heidi - stress and the calming effect of haiku

Jon - Akito Arima, nuclear physicist Japanese haiku poet and MU physics graduate, Rick Bearce

Jordan - haiku with a comic twist

Kelsey - haiga, Japanese paintings often done by poets and accompanied by a haiku.

Kenneth - how haiku can be inspiring and encouraging

Matt - the deep, dark, depressing side of the spectrum (George Swede?)

Molly - Peggy Lyles

Randi - haiku as a sort of comic relief. I want to analyze some haiku that sound very serious at first, and then take a turn making them funny. (senryu)

Sarah - Peggy Lyles

Therese - explore the different uses of water (whether to cleanse, drown, etc.) in haiku

(3) reading: Chapters 1-2 of Matsuo Bashô by Ueda (pages 1-68). Select three favorite haiku from Bashô. Write a paragraph response to three of these haiku. email due midnight, March 20.

(4) writing haiku: open topic 4-8 new haiku


for 3/26 - haiku of the day --> Amanda

reading: Haiku Guy, pages 1-80

writing response 1: Practice the exercise of stop, look, and listen as described in the book. Find something, whether it be in your dorm, on campus, or somewhere where you can sit quietly without distraction and observe a particular thing, area, or person. Then, write about what you observed, describing what stuck out to you.

haiku writing: write 3 haiku from this stop, look & listen exercise.

Think about the source of your haiku. Where do your haiku originate? Why do you notice, observe, feel, reflect or focus on those things for immediate impact and lasting significance? Where do your very best haiku come from? What's your haiku muse? Your inspiration to write?

writing response 2: Compare the advice given to Buck-Teeth of poets Mido and Kuro. What do you think of each of their advice? Which appeals to you more? Explain why. Write 3 haiku following Kuro's advice, and 3 haiku from Mido's.

Extra credit: bring to class one haiku written following Shiro's advice.

Email your haiku, your Mido/Kuro/Shiro advice response by Sunday midnight. March 24.


for 3/28 - haiku of the day --> Therese

reading: Haiku Guy, pages 80-end

writing response 1: Give your reading of Issa's snail haiku.

writing response 2: How would you rewrite "The Tattoo" chapter (p. 134)? How you think that scene should have happened or ended?

Creative Writing of fictional haibun: As you read Haiku Guy, begin developing a character who writes haiku. Write a short short short story or one-act play in which the character encounters problems with creativity or love or inspiration or life or . . . (you fill in the blank). Include at least three episodes/scenes. Include 3-5 haiku in your haiku story scenes by characters in your story. Leave it open-ended with a haiku! Maximum of three pages! Have fun with this.

Email your snail and Tattoo chapter responses by midnight Wednesday, March 25.


for 4/2 - haiku of the day --> Jon

Haiku writing 1: write 3-5 haiku on family and/or Easter

Email your short short short story by midnight Sunday, March 31.

Contemporary Haiku Study (we will have a few presentations on April 2, but the majority will be on April 4)

NOTE: the official due date has been changed to April 4


for 4/4 - haiku of the day -->

Contemporary Haiku Study (due April 4) presentations

• bring a handout sheet to class with books used cited & include all haiku in your essay (19 copies)
• email your final version of the essay to me by midnight, Wednesday, April 3
• no powerpoint needed, but bring the books used as visual

haiku writing (from in class): send at least three caps from the tan-renga hokku


for 4/11 - haiku of the day --> Alex

(1) Write 3-5 haiku using the 5-7-5 pattern and send them to me by midnight Wendesday, April 10.

(2) reading response: Bashô (Chapter 3 The Renku), pages 69-111 and email a ¶ me about one favorite link (or pair of links) in one of the renku examples. email by midnight Wendesday, April 10.

(3) authors choose favorite tan-renga cap: email me which cap you choose as favorite for your haiku from the tan-renga


for 4/16 - haiku of the day --> Charlie

(1) Read the student kasen renga by Bri Hill and students at: http://performance.millikin.edu/haiku/studentrenga/Grasshoppers&Tobacco.html

(2) team writing assignment: write 2 rengay (one with someone from class or a former class) and (one with someone who has not had previous experiences with haiku) following the guidelines in the handout, HOW TO WRITE RENGAY (download).

(3) write 3-5 new haiku - open topic

(4) EXTRA CREDIT: (Not required) Prepare a submission to the Undergraduate Haiku Award Competition and send it with the $10 entry fee following these instructions.

Note: at least one of your haiku for this competition needs to be a 5-7-5 haiku.

The Myong Cha Son Haiku Award welcomes unpublished, original haiku for consideration in the competition. We ask that applicants adhere to the following guidelines. The annual competition is open to all undergraduate poets who are enrolled in a college/university in the United States.

The submission should consist of a cover letter and up to three poems. Please put only the title of the poem at the top of the manuscript. The author's name, address, e-mail address, and telephone number should be placed on a separate sheet.

There is a $10 entry fee for submission of up to three poems. Make payment to: WCU Foundation. All submissions must be postmarked no later than April 15, 2013. Submitted poems will not be returned. For notification of contest results please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Manuscripts should be sent to:

Iris N. Spencer Undergraduate Poetry Awards
Poetry House
West Chester University
West Chester, PA 19383

The winner will receive a $1500 award and the runner-up will receive $500.

Email your (1) two rengay, (2) 3-5 new haiku, (3) Award submission to me by midnight, Sunday, April 14


for 4/18 - haiku of the day --> Matt

In class mad renga - write a link and pass it around (14 kasen in 90 minutes).

Mad Verse Kasen 1 - Peace At Last, started by Randy Brooks
Mad Verse Kasen 2 - Love. Eevn when it's hard, started by Emily D'Ambrose
Mad Verse Kasen 3 - Scraps in the Trashcan, started by Alex Buchko
Mad Verse Kasen 4 - After the Rain, started by Courtney Burress
Mad Verse Kasen 5 - Summer Rain, started by Heidi A. Zapp
Mad Verse Kasen 6 - Leap of Faith, started by Kenneth Albin
Mad Verse Kasen 7 - You Had Me at Goodbye, started by Randi Mehrmann
Mad Verse Kasen 8 - of treasure forgotten, started by Sarah E. Kisly
Mad Verse Kasen 9 - Dead of Night, started by Amanda Lee
Mad Verse Kasen 10 - Home Soon, started by Therese O'Shaughnessy
Mad Verse Kasen 11 - Dreams, started by Emily Crutchfield
Mad Verse Kasen 12 - The Frog's Shadow, started by Kelsey Meredith
Mad Verse Kasen 13 - xxxxx, started by Jordan Caulk
Mad Verse Kasen 14 - Halloween Game, started by Jonathan Robertson
Mad Verse Kasen 15 - Ravenous Romance, started by Charlie Decker


for 4/23 - haiku of the day -->

(1) Read the student kasen renga by Bri Hill and students at: http://performance.millikin.edu/haiku/studentrenga/Grasshoppers&Tobacco.html

(2) Plan a haiku writing gathering with classmates and/or friends (groups of 4-7). This can be any day with the resulting kasen-renga (36-links) due midnight, Sunday, April 21.

Here is a DOC file you can use to print your kasen-renga: renga layout guide (doc).

This is a gathering for writing linked verse—if it's nice out you could gather in the park or at Rock Springs or at someone's place. Allow the spirit of the place where you gather to be a springboard for the haiku, but don't limit yourself to that place once you get into the linking. Let your links go out through time and seasons moving from person (ninjo) focused to non-person (ninjo-nashi) focus to avoid too much continuity of persons or scenes. Try to avoid more than three ninjo or ninjo-nashi links in a row. Remember, every two links make a new poem.

Using the following guide (derived largely from Shirane's book Traces of Dreams, try writing a kasen-no-renga.

(1) ninjô verses—people or emotion or human environment verses (self, other or both)
(2) ninjô-nashi—non-people or things or place or nature-only verses

Write a 36 link kasen-no-renga:

(1) hokku—sets tone, greets all, establishes season, quiets guests to join in
(2) wakiku—builds on unstated elements of the hokku and maintains season. ends in a noun
(3) daisanku—ends with open-ended image (often transitive verb ING)
(5) usually moon shows up here for the first time
(6) concludes the first page (jo) often written by the official scribe
(7)-(29) heats up the links and leaping (intensification)
(13) moon appears again
(17) blossoms usually show up here
(29) moon’s third and final appearance
(30)-(36) kyû—the slow down finale (quiets back down into calmness)
(35) cherry blossoms always here
(36) end with openness and reverberation

Publication fold/design questions?
The paper is folded into 4 panels for each side (cathedral door style).
Panel 1 (outside cover) – title, date, place, copyright, (sometimes authors)
Panel 2 (first fold inside left panel) – first six links
Panel 3 (further inside far left panel) – next six links
Panel 4 (far left inside page panel) – next six links
Panel 5 (right center page panel) – next six links
Panel 6 (far right inside page panel) – next six links
Panel 7 (last fold inside right page panel) – next six links
Panel 8 (back outside cover) – acknowledgments & author links
optional obi (paper belt around the folded renga)

email me your kasen-renga due Sunday, Midnight April 21. and bring one copy to class (properly folded and belted) for sharing in class on April 23

Kasen 1 Fishing Boots by Alex Buchko, Courtney Burress, Randi Mehrmann, & Heidi A. Zapp

Kasen 2 Chiseled Cheese by Amanda Lee & Sarah Mann

Kasen 3 Seasons of the Heart by the “Anker girls” led by Sarah E. Kisly

Kasen 4 Growth by Kelsey Meredith, Molly McCullough, Emily Crutchfield, & Darien M. Sloat

Kasen 5 A Formal Affair by Emily D'Ambrose, Susie Wirthlin, & Merissa Marx

Kasen 6 Memories Flooding Back by Kenneth Albin & Jonathan Robertson

Kasen 7 Ghouls & Goblins by Therese O'Shaughnessy, Carla Franzene, & Caleb Goding

Kasen 8 In the Soup by Charlie Decker, Matt Swofford, Jordan Caulk, & China Brickey


for 4/25 - haiku of the day --> Matt

(1) reading: The Millikin University Haiku Anthology

(2) reader response: write response paragraphs and response haiku for three favorite haiku from the MU Haiku Anthology email your responses by Wednesday, midnight April 24.

(3) writing haiku: 3-10 haiku open topic for our final kukai emailed to me by Wednesday, midnight April 24.

(4) haiku project proposal

The purpose of the haiku project is to apply haikai arts to something that means a lot to the student—usually something related to their major field of study. Bring your passion to this project and connect it to haiku (photography & haiku) (music & haiku) (history and haiku) (psychology & senryu) (a kasen renga) (baseball haiku) (a collage of haiku) (haiku web site) (anthology of love haiku) . . . have fun with this. make it your dream assignment. email me a paragraph explaining your project plan by midnight April 28.

You can see sample previous haiku projects at:

http://performance.millikin.edu/haiku/studentprojects.html

Haiku projects are due May 7

4/26 - Extra credit Haiku Cut Competition!

Celebrations of Scholarship - 3-5pm - Pilling Chapel, April 26, 2013

Bring your best haiku on a sheet of paper or on cards. This is a slam-style competition in public tournament style. To become Grand Champion, your team will have up to at least 25 winning haiku, so bring plenty of haiku to the competition. Here are possible slam round topics: certain Japanese aesthetics such as sabi, wabi, aware, karumi, and yugen. There will also be American aesthetics rounds such as first date, graduation, awkwardness, spring break, grooviness, April fool's, peace, love, old jeans, summer vacation and angst.

Extra credit for competing or attending. Write an email response to the event after the fact.


for 4/30 - haiku of the day -->Matt

(1) final kukai haiku submitted by midnight, Sunday, April 28 (revisions of any not born in kukai or matching contest)

(2) Haiku project proposal due midnight April 28.

(3) Write 5-10 haiku related to your project proposal due by email April 28.


for 5/2

(1) reading: School's Out by Randy Brooks

(2) writing response: write a reader response to 1 or 2 favorite haiku from School's Out due by email May 1.

(3) writing haiku: write 3-5 haiku open topic (or in response to dr b's haiku) due by email, midnight, May 1.


for 5/7

haiku projects due (to be shared this last day of class). email the contents of your projects (the haiku at least and introduction & photographs or power point, etc) by Midnight May 5.

Alex - haiku movie game - guess the childhood movie from the haiku

Amanda - country music haiku

Charlie - double bass haiku

Courtney - "Haikugrass" - a collection of bluegrass haiku

Darien - haiku sequence story

Emily C. - mother daughter haiku

Emily D. & Sarah - cooking haiku

Heidi - haiku from songs condensed from a muscian

Jon - inspirational sports movie haiku

Jordan - new perspectives to illustrate of my haiku

Kelsey - autobiography in haiku

Kenneth - running haiku

Matt - write and record a new song with lyrics in haiku

Molly - black and white photography & haiku

Randi - haiku letters to her sailor

Therese - haiku love letters to a soldier


for 5/9 - last day of class

Signature Gift Exchange & Sharing Haiku Collections & Projects

(1) Signature haiku gift exchange (digital photo sent to me) and haiku chapbook collections (email to me) are due Wednesday, May 8.

The signature haiku process—a haiku to give to others when they ask about haiku that can be used to teach them about haiku and to share some of your work with them. A haiku you want to be known for or known by—one that works with a lot of readers. A gift of a haiku insight . . . often presented as a gift of some sort such as a bookmark, a small haiku stone, etc.

BRING 18 copies to class!

(2) Haiku Collection Booklets due: Select and organize your best haiku & senryu & haibun & renga into a collection. Make a little booklet, or print them in a binder, or write them in a blank book.

Select and organize your best haiku & senryu & haibun & renga into a small booklet or collection. Give your collection a title and a © 2013 page. (Often signature haiku are connected to the title.) Include a dedication page if you would like to.

Be sure to write an author's introduction to your collection which explains your title and expresses your approach or why these are the ones you have included in your collection (your poetics preface). Ask a reading partner to write a short introduction to your collection, maybe pointing out one or two favorites—or their observation about something unique about your haiku (the reader's introduction). The reader's introduction should help strangers appreciate and value your collection.

Bring your Haiku Collection to class!

Don't forget to e-mail a copy of the contents of your collection including your introduction to Dr. Brooks by midnight, Wednesday, May 8!

Don't forget to e-mail your short bio statement to Dr. Brooks by midnight, May 8. This bio statement will be used at our Global Haiku final exam Reading.


for 5/14 - final exam reading --> 10:30am - 12:30pm Fireplace Room, RTUC

(1) The Spring Global Haiku Reading

I will bring your chapbook collections and return them to you at the final Global Haiku Reading.

Signature haiku book - Matt is our host (welcoming everyone & inviting them to sign the signature book)
Refreshments - Charlie (cookies), Emily D (punch), Matt, Randy (napkins & cups)
Publicity - Matt (facebook event), xxxxx? (flyer)
Chalk the walk - Heidi, Alex, Charlie, Therese, Matt, Kenneth

Extra credit is available for bringing 2 or more guests to the reading, or for helping with one of our haiku reading tasks.

(2) Submissions to Haiku magazines Final. (one email submission copied to me & one snail mail submission brought to the final exam in envelopes)

Type a selection of 5 of your best haiku with your name and address on the upper left hand corner of the page. Also bring an envelope with your name and address in the upper left hand corner. Also include a self addressed envelope with your name and address in both the upper left hand corner and the addressee spot. Include one dollar or two stamps for postage in one of the envelopes. (Many will be submitted to magazines overseas, so please don't stick the stamps on the envelopes.)