Advanced Studies in Poetry: Global Haiku Tradition
IN203 Humanities Honors Seminar - Spring 2015
Dr. Randy Brooks

Millikin University
Shilling 209
rbrooks@millikin.edu

Global Haiku Tradition Assignments Blog - Spring 2015

<http://performance.millikin.edu/haiku/courses/globalSpring2015/assignments.html>

Classroom: Library 029

Informal Reader Response Writing & Haiku Writing (20 days) (10 each) • 200 total points
Kasen Renga • 20 points
Contemporary Haiku Essay (mid-term) • 100 points
Haiku Project • 100 points
Haiku Collection (paper booklet & by email) • 100 points
Haiku Collection Poetics Preface on YOUR Art of Writing Haiku • 20 points
Signature Haiku Gift Exchange • 20 points
Submission Ready (page in envelopes) • 20 points
Final Reading • 20 points

ALL ASSIGNMENTS are to be submitted by email.
Send them to: rbrooks@millikin.edu
(Use your SAVE AS function and choose “Rich Text Format” or “DOC” for digital files.)

Final Exam Haiku Reading: 2pm, May 14, Kirkland 128


Haiku Community Links:

Haiku Society of America • http://www.hsa-haiku.org/
American Haiku Archives • http://www.americanhaikuarchives.org/
Haiku Chronicles • http://www.haikuchronicles.com/
The Haiku Foundation • http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/
Simply Haiku • http://www.simplyhaiku.com
Heron's Nest • http://www.theheronsnest.com/
Modern Haiku • http://www.modernhaiku.org/
A Hundred Gourds • http://ahundredgourds.com
World Kigo Database • http://worldkigodatabase.blogspot.com/
Haibun Today • http://haibuntoday.com/


Extra Credit Opportunities:

(1) Japan House Tea Ceremonies

Japan House is delighted to announce that tea ceremonies will now be offered to the public on the third Saturday of each month at 3:00 p.m.

Tea ceremonies will continue to be offered every Thursday at 2:00 and 3:00. Please join us and find a moment of peace as you experience the Way of Tea.

What should I wear to a tea ceremony?

You need to wear white socks in order to walk on the tatami mats in the tea rooms. You will want to wear something in which you will be comfortable kneeling or sitting on the tatami mats. The tea ceremony hosts would prefer if you do not wear blue jeans or shorts.

(2) Haiku & Poetry Readings

Check here for extra credit opportunities to participate or attend haiku & poetry readings.
Extra credit for competing or attending. Write an email response to the event after the fact.

Extra Credit Opportunity 1:

Millikin University book publishing company, Bronze Man Books, is hosting a "Broken Hearts" poetry reading for Valentine's Day, on February 12, Thursday at Pilling Chapel at 7pm. If you go & participate (you can write up your experience in an email to me for extra credit). Double points if you read yours or Masajo's love haiku at the open mic!

Extra Credit Opportunity 2:

HAIKU CUT! - April 10th at 5:30 & 6:30pm. Attend and participate by competing in this year's HAIKU CUT poetry slam at the After Five Live event at Blue Connection and the Decatur Area Arts Council. This is a fun competition. Bring your haiku on cards ready to go head-to-head with other haiku writing teams.

(4) Youtube Haiku Magazine

The first issue of Frozen Butterfly, the video journal of English-Language haiku has been released and is now available to watch via YouTube. The journal was founded, and is currently edited and produced by John McManus, and he invites submissions from Millikin haiku students. The journal's mission is to showcase a broad range of styles and approaches to English-Language haiku. For full details visit the blog at <http://frozenbutterflyjournal.blogspot.co.uk/>.

 


Kukai Favorite Selections

Haiku to Edit 1Haiku to Edit Results

Memory Writing 1

Kukai 1Kukai 1 Favorites

1 Matching Contest - Health & Fitness
1 Matching Contest - Favorites

Kukai 2Kukai 2 Favorites

Kukai 3Kukai 3 Favorites

Ekphrastic KukaiEkphrastic Favorites

Hoops Haiku

Kukai 4Kukai 4 Favorites

2 Matching Contest - Mido
2 Matching Contest - Mido Favorites

3 Matching Contest - Kuro
3 Matching Contest - Kuro Favorites

Kukai 5Kukai 5 Favorites

Kukai 6Kukai 6 Favorites

Kukai 7Kukai 7 Favorites

4 Matching Contest - Easter
4 Matching Contest - Favorites

1 Tan-renga1 Tan-renga Capped

Kukai 8Kukai 8 Favorites


Reading & Writing Assignments by Dates:

for 1/20 - haiku of the day --> Dr. Brooks

reading: Mayfly magazine sample


for 1/22 - haiku of the day --> Eve

(1) writing response: send me an email copy of your in-class response to a favorite haiku in MAYFLY

(2) haiku writing: write your first 5-10 haiku attempts on transition times—lulls of dawn, of dusk, of relationships, of states of consciousness, of between semesters).

reading: To Hear the Rain, pages 1-64, introductions, prose (and the interview in the back of the book)

(3) writing response: find 3 favorite Lyles haiku—write your imagined felt responses to them (one paragraph each)

REMEMBER to cite each haiku fully (do not add capital letters or punctuation) like this:

cucumbers
soaked in vinegar—
the heat

          Lyles, THTR, 48

(email Dr. Brooks (rbrooks@millikin.edu) your 1 Mayfly response, your 3 Lyles responses & 5-10 haiku by midnight Wednesday, January 21)


for 1/27 - haiku of the day --> Austyn

reading: To Hear the Rain, pages 65-end (read the interview at the back)

(4) haiku reading responses: select 3 more favorite haiku by Peggy Lyles and briefly write your imagined, felt response to them. be ready to discuss why you like them.

(5) writing extended memory & memory haiku: then go into more depth with a fourth haiku that especially triggered memories from your childhood or past (about a one page memoir) describing a memory from your own life. THEN write 3 haiku which capture different moments or feelings from within that longer memory from your experience.

(6) haiku write: 7-10 new haiku on the being cold or winter.

(email your 3 short responses & one 1-page sensory memory writing & 7-10 new haiku by midnight Sunday, 1/25)

in class: haiku to edit 1

in class: new haiku from the memory writing 1


for 1/29 - haiku of the day --> Brandon

(7) revise or write 3 or more new haiku from the Lyles haiku memory writing and 1 from your neighbor's story.

(8) haiku to edit 1: based on the haiku editing workshop in class on Thursday, send me variations and edit suggestions for at least three haiku by others from the HAIKU TO EDIT 1 handout.

reading: handout of haiku from Almost Unseen by George Swede (available from Moodle)

(9) writing response 1: find three favorite haiku from the George Swede handout and write a short response paragrapsh about them.

(email Dr. Brooks (rbrooks@millikin.edu) your 1 Mayfly response, your 3 Lyles responses & 5-10 haiku by midnight Wednesday, January 28)


for 2/3 - haiku of the day --> Nic

(10) reading response: compare the genesis of discourse for your two authors (George Swede and Peggy Lyles). why do they choose to write haiku about these moments? what is the source of significance worth turning into a literary artwork for them? authenticity? integrity? artistic playfulness? what they pay attention to? what they care about?

(11) reading response: find an interesting "matched pair" of haiku (one from George Swede and one from Peggy Lyles or a Mayfly author) to read side by side. write a short analysis of the writing strategies and techniquse used in these haiku. (not reader response but analysis of writing techniques such as line break, word choice, arrangement, rhythm, sounds, emphasis, break, voice, tone, attitude, etc.). one page maximum for your analysis (half a page is fine).

reading: Gail Sher - Guide for Beginning Haiku (availabe as PDF from Moodle)

(12) reading response: compare Gail Sher's suggestions for writing haiku with the inroduction and interview in Peggy Lyles' book (one page max)

(13) haiku write: 5-10 haiku on college life and the angst of being human and 5-10 haiku OPEN TOPIC.

Due by email midnight Sunday, February 1.


for 2/5 - haiku of the day --> Lexy

(14) writing response to Kukai 1: write your imagined felt responses to 2 favorite haiku from kukai 1

reading: Love Haiku by Masajo Suzuki, Introduction and haiku from pages 1-64

(15) reading response 1: find three favorite haiku by Masajo and write a short response paragraph to them.

(16) writing health & more love haiku or senryu: 5-10 new haiku on experiences/insights/feelings/perceptions of health and well-being activities—biking, running, swimming, relaxing, Tai Chi, yoga, meditation, working out, sports, eating well, skin, muscles, abs.

email your responses and your new haiku attempts by midnight Wednesday, 2/4


for 2/10 - haiku of the day --> Kendall

reading: Love Haiku by Masajo Suzuki, Introduction and haiku from pages 64-128

(17) reading responses: find two favorite haiku by Masajo and write a short response paragraph to both of them. (email your 2 response paragraphs to me by midnight Wednesday Feb. 7)

(18) reading response: find one more favorite haiku by Masajo. Let your response be a more extended imaginative memory or purely fictional piece about someone spinning off the third Masajo haiku as its starting point. End your short fictional piece with a haiku (edit 2-3 variations of the same haiku). Two pages pages max!

(19) response writing: write about an interesting match that came up in the matching contest 1 (comparing the two haiku and making your point about which one "wins" the match.

(20) write 1-2 haiku with "clock" (Thanks Austyn!)

(21) writing haiku or senryu on relationships: write 5-10 haiku on any OPEN topic and 5-10 more haiku on first dates, breaking up, romance, girl friends, boy friends, love. Not necessarily all lovey-dovey cliches, but love, lust, crushes, unrequited love, good friends, bitterness about love, winter dance, sock hop, blind date, romance, vampire love, and so on.

email your responses and your new haiku attempts by midnight Sunday, 2/8


for 2/12 - haiku of the day --> Nicole

reading: Millikin University Haiku Anthology and search for haiku about love & relationships.

(21) response writing: write about 2 favorite haiku related to love, relationships, broken hearts, etc

(22) valentine haiku gift exchange: bring 14 copies of one of your favorite love haiku (a relationship haiku by you) and sign the 14 copies for a Valentine's Day gift exchange. Have fun with this!

(23) writing response to Kukai 2: write your imagined felt responses to 2 favorite haiku from kukai 2 favorites

email your responses and your new valentine gift exchange haiku by midnight Wednesday, 2/11

Extra Credit Opportunity on Thursday evening:

Bronze Man Books is hosting a "Broken Hearts" poetry reading for Valentine's Day, on February 12, Thursday at Pilling Chapel at 7pm. If you go & participate (you can write up your experience in an email to me for extra credit). Double points if you read yours or Masajo's love haiku at the open mic!


for 2/17 - haiku of the day --> Alex

reading: The Millikin University Haiku Anthology, pages 1-192

(24) reader response: write response paragraphs for three favorite haiku from the MU Haiku Anthology

(25) haiku writing: write 3-5 haiku in response to favorites from the MU Haiku Anthology

(26) haiku writing: write 5-10 haiku on anything OPEN TOPIC - things that are important in your life

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Sunday, 2/15


for 2/19

in class group dialogue: what are the essential elements of the very best haiku? What makes some haiku better than others? How would you define or describe the characteristics of the best haiku? What must a highest-quality haiku do (for? with?) for readers to be effective?

genre n 1: a kind of literary or artistic work 2: a style of expressing yourself in writing [syn: writing style, literary genre] 3: a class of artistic endeavor having a characteristic form or technique. (dictionary.com)

literary genre n : a style of expressing yourself in writing [syn: writing style, genre] (dictionary.com)

genre (zhän`r?), in art-history terminology, a type of painting dealing with unidealized scenes and subjects of everyday life. Although practiced in ancient art, as shown by Pompeiian frescoes, and in the Middle Ages, genre was not recognized as worthy and independent subject matter until the 16th cent. in Flanders. There it was popularized by Pieter Bruegel, the elder. It flourished in Holland in the 17th cent. in the works of Ter Borch, Brouwer, Metsu, De Hooch, Vermeer, and many others, and extended to France and England, where in the 18th and 19th cent., its major practitioners were Watteau, Chardin, Greuze, Morland, and Wilkie. In Italy genre elements were present in Carpaccio's and Caravaggio's paintings, but not until the 18th cent. did genre become the specialty of an Italian artist, Pietro Longhi. The French impressionists often painted genre subjects as did members of the American ashcan school. (Columbia encyclopedia)

see Wikipedia for an introductory discussion of genre at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literary_genre

Definitions of genres, especially literary genres, usually includes some expectations of form or structure, so our next question is to consider the formal elements of haiku. But genres also include certain expectation of content expectations and certain aesthetic experiences.

(27) writing response to Kukai 2: write your imagined felt responses to 2 favorite haiku from kukai 3

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Wednesday, 2/18


for 2/24

(28) email your written team/partner report plans: one person write your team's statement of the essential elements, techniques, characteristics of the best, well-crafted, well-written haiku . . . what are characteristics of your favorite, most effective haiku (use at least 3-5 examples from readings so far). This is the first half of a genre study of haiku. Also, let me know what your group is planning to compare the art of haiku to.

(29) writing haiku: 5 haiku related to elements (things, reality, settings, contexts) often associated with your comparison genre.

(30) haiku writing: write 5-10 haiku on anything OPEN TOPIC - things that are important in your life

Presentations/Activities begin on Tuesday, 2/24 (powerpoint, prezi, game, interactive activity or handouts).

Be ready to make your presentation comparing and contrasting haiku to another area. Include sample haiku and sample exhibits of the other things as well.

email your presentation/game plans your new haiku by midnight, Sunday 22

email your team presentation materials by midnight, Monday 23


for 2/26 - continue presentations & kukai!

(31) submit new haiku related to the paintings images received in class

email your presentation/game plans your new haiku by midnight, Wednesday 25


for 3/3 - haiku of the day --> Alex

Reading & DVD viewing: Haiku: The Art of the Short Poem, pages 1-88 (whole book). Ideally, invite some friends or classmates over to watch the DVD video included in the back cover of this book. The haiku cited by the haiku poets are included in the anthology, in the same order as the DVD.

(32) reader response: write response paragraphs for two favorite haiku from Haiku: The Art of the Short Poem

(33) reader response: write a response about what you realized about the English-langauge haiku poetry community from the video. also briefly discuss one of the haiku poets who especially intrigued you.

(34) writing haiku: open topic 8-10 new haiku

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Sunday, 3/1


for 3/5

reading: The Haiku Anthology, pages 1-90 including the introductions

(35) reader response: write response paragraphs for three favorite haiku from the The Haiku Anthology

(36) write new haiku: write 5-10 haiku in response to The Haiku Anthology favorites or open topics.

(37) writing response to Kukai 4: write your imagined felt responses to 2 favorite haiku from kukai 4 favorites

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Wednesday, 3/4


for 3/17 - Spring Break! - haiku of the day --> Eli

Take a break and enjoy being with friends, family and quiet time with yourself.

(38) haiku writing: write 10-20 haiku or a haiku sequence over Spring Break about your life's reality during spring break or about special locations and places of significance to you in your home town or travel. Don't write a bunch of cliches or stereotypical spring break stuff. Write from the reality of YOUR actual spring break.

email your spring break haiku by Sunday midnight, March 15. for our kukai! Yes, spring break kukai will be Tuesday!


for 3/19 - haiku of the day -->Eli

reading: The Haiku Anthology, pages 91-195

(39) reader response: write response paragraphs for three favorite haiku from the The Haiku Anthology

(40) write new haiku: write 8-10 haiku in response to The Haiku Anthology favorites or open topics.

(41) writing response to Spring Break Kukai 5: write your imagined felt responses to 2 favorite haiku from kukai 5

Midterm Essay Preview - Author or Haiku topic Study:

Think about what or who you'd like to write about for your contemporary haiku reader response essay. You may want to browse the Registry of haiku poets at The Haiku Foundation <http://www.thehaikufoundation.org>. These essays are due March 31, about 2 weeks after Spring break. In order to loan you books from the Decatur Haiku Collection, I need to know your intended topic or author by Wednesday at midnight, March 18. Here's guidelines for this assignment:

haiku author or topic study: A formal essay introducing a particular contemporary author, topic or technical approach to contemporary haiku readers. This is a reader-response essay, so the primary source for your essay will be your own readings and analyses of 6-10 haiku. If you are doing an author focus, discuss your author's approach to writing haiku. You may choose to write about a haiku topic instead of an author, with reader responses to 6-10 haiku related to that topic. Matching comparisons with haiku by other authors are always valued in all approaches to this essay. This can focus on one book by the author in the form of a book review essay or on a particular theme or technical approach to haiku by the author.

o focus on a point of insight or question about that author’s unique contribution
o include response discussions of 6-10 haiku by the author
o optional to include at a matching comparison to a haiku by another author (or more)
o may include email or in-person interview questions to help address the haiku writer's poetics

Length? 5-10 pages single-spaced. Citations? Full citation of each source within text first time mentioned (followed by haiku citation convention of author, publication title abbreviated, page number) for subsequent mentions. Yes, do include a works-cited page.

Adam - Graham High
Alex - Lee Gurga
Austyn - Alexis Rotella
Brandon - Wally Swist
Eli – Rod Willmot
Eve - Aubrie Cox
Francesca - Roberta Beary
Katelyn - Elizabeth Searl Lamb
Kendall - Marlene Mountain
Kyler - Cor van den Heuval
Lexy - George Swede
Nic - George Swede
Nicole - Ryan Mecum


for 3/24

reading: Haiku Guy, pages 1-80

(42) writing response: Practice the exercise of stop, look, and listen as described in the book. Find something, whether it be in your dorm, on campus, or somewhere where you can sit quietly without distraction and observe a particular thing, area, or person. Then, write about what you observed, describing what stuck out to you.

(43) haiku writing: write 3 haiku from this stop, look & listen exercise.

Think about the source of your haiku. Where do your haiku originate? Why do you notice, observe, feel, reflect or focus on those things for immediate impact and lasting significance? Where do your very best haiku come from? What's your haiku muse? Your inspiration to write?

(44) writing response: Compare the advice given to Buck-Teeth of poets Mido and Kuro. What do you think of each of their advice? Which appeals to you more? Explain why.

(45) Write 3 haiku following Kuro's advice, and 3 haiku following Mido's approach.

Extra credit: bring to class one haiku written following Shiro's advice.

Email your haiku, your edited haibun, your Mido/Kuro/Shiro advice response by Sunday midnight. March 22.


for 3/26 - haiku of the day --> Adam

reading: The Haiku Anthology, pages 196-327

(46) reader response: select 3 favorites and write a paragraph response to 3 favorite haiku

(47) writing haiku: write 5 haiku in response or reaction to 5 haiku by your author (or THE HAIKU ANTHOLOGY) you are studying/reading

(48) writing response: write about a favorite pair from one of our matching contests Kuro or Mido

(49) write haiku: 2-3 haiku on the topics (tombstone & happiness) from our matching contest champions.

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Wednesday, 3/25


for 3/31 - haiku of the day --> xxxxx

reading: Haiku Guy, pages 80-end

(50) writing response: write your reading of Issa's snail haiku.

(51) As you finish reading Haiku Guy, write a short short story (or dialogue) about your own fictional character who writes haiku. Begin writing a short story in which the character encounters several problems.

Try to include at least three episodes/scenes. Include at least 5-10 haiku in your haiku story scenes by characters in your story. Finish your haiku short story (a culminating scene) and of leave it open-ended with a haiku! You may use any haiku you have written this semester in your story (or base the story around some of your haiku). AND you may use haiku from classmates or authors we have read as long as you attribute them in your story.

Length of your short story or dialogue? (2 pages minimum and 6 pages maximum & 5 haiku miniimum and 10 haiku maximum) And yes, you do need a title for your story. You may write this as a short short play or diaglogue instead of story. (Dialogues tend to be a little longer because of breaking every speaker into a new paragraph.)

Email your responses,haiku and short short story by Sunday midnight. March 29.


for 4/2

(52) writing response: write about 2 favorite haiku from kukai 6

(53) haiku writing: write 3-5 April Fool's day haiku & 3-5 open topic haiku

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Wednesday, 4/1


for 4/7

(54) reading response writing: Share 10-15 of your best haiku with family and friends over spring break, and see which ones they like the best. Write an email to me about favorites selected by your family and friends. Which ones did they like best and why?

(55) write 5-10 Easter break haiku

Essays are due Midnight, April 6th, with presentations starting April 7th. For your presentation, bring a one-page handout (15 copies) with all of the haiku from your essay. Include at least 1 or your own haiku on the handout.

email your essay, favorite haiku responses & new haiku by midnight, Monday April 6th


for 4/9

(56) write 5-10 new haiku, open topic

Extra credit opportunity: HAIKU CUT! - April 10th at 5:30 & 6:30pm. Attend and participate by competing in this year's HAIKU CUT poetry slam at the After Five Live event at Blue Connection and the Decatur Area Arts Council. This is a fun competition. Bring your haiku on cards ready to go head-to-head with other haiku writing teams.


for 4/14 - scheduling day (no class)

(57) SEND ME YOUR VOTES for up to 10 favorites from Kukai 7 (and double-vote by writing responses to 3-4 favorites)

(58) write 10 more haiku - open topic

email your votes, favorites & new haiku by midnight, Sunday April 12


for 4/16

(59) reading response writing: Chapters 1-2 of Matsuo Bashô by Ueda (pages 1-68). Select three favorite haiku from Bashô. Write a paragraph response to these three haiku.

(60) haiku response writing: write 3-5 haiku in response to favorite Basho haiku

(61) response writing: Find two matching English haiku to Bashô's haiku—one representing the aesthetic of sabi and one the aesthetic experience of karumi. Write a paragraph for each pair comparing these English haiku with those by Basho. One sabi haiku not by Basho compared to one sabi haiku by Basho. And one karumi haiku not by Basho compared to one karumi haiku by Basho.

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Wednesday, 4/8


for 4/21

(62) reading: Bashô (Chapter 3 The Renku), pages 69-111 and write a response to a favorite link (a pair of links) in one of the renku examples

(63) tan-renga capping: send me caps for 4-6 of the tan-renga hokku (handout)

(64) take turns with friends and write a sequence of 9 to 15 haiku (in person is most fun, but email is possible)

(65) haiku project proposal

The purpose of the haiku project is to apply haikai arts to something that means a lot to the student—usually something related to their major field of study. Bring your passion to this project and connect it to haiku (photography & haiku) (music & haiku) (history and haiku) (psychology & senryu) (a kasen renga) (baseball haiku) (a collage of haiku) (haiku web site) (anthology of love haiku) . . . have fun with this. make it your dream assignment. email me a paragraph explaining your project plan by midnight April 19.

You can see sample previous haiku projects at:

http://performance.millikin.edu/haiku/studentprojects.html

Haiku projects are due midnight, Sunday, May 3
Project presentations are May 5

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Sunday, 4/19


for 4/23 in class - Mad Verse Renga!

(66) reading: School's Out by Randy Brooks

(67) writing response: write reader responses to 2 favorite haiku from School's Out

(68) write 5-10 haiku related to your project proposal

Extra credit opportunity: HAIKU CUT! - April 24 at 3:00 pm.

Attend and participate by competing in this year's HAIKU CUT poetry slam at Pilling Chapel during Celebrations of Scholarship. This is a fun competition. Bring your haiku on cards ready to go head-to-head with other haiku writing teams.

email your responses and your new haiku by midnight Wednesdat, 4/22


for 4/28

(69) type your Mad-verse Kasen renga completed in class with this: 10 point kasen renga template

(70) Read the student kasen renga by Bri Hill and students at:

http://performance.millikin.edu/haiku/studentrenga/Grasshoppers&Tobacco.html

(71) Plan a haiku writing gathering with classmates and/or friends (groups of 4-7). This can be any day with the resulting kasen-renga (36-links) due midnight, Sunday, April 26.

Here is a DOC file you can use to print your kasen-renga: renga layout guide (doc).

This is a gathering for writing linked verse—if it's nice out you could gather in the park or at Rock Springs or at someone's place. Allow the spirit of the place where you gather to be a springboard for the haiku, but don't limit yourself to that place once you get into the linking. Let your links go out through time and seasons moving from person (ninjo) focused to non-person (ninjo-nashi) focus to avoid too much continuity of persons or scenes. Try to avoid more than three ninjo or ninjo-nashi links in a row. Remember, every two links make a new poem.

Using the following guide (derived largely from Shirane's book Traces of Dreams, try writing a kasen-no-renga.

(1) ninjô verses—people or emotion or human environment verses (self, other or both)
(2) ninjô-nashi—non-people or things or place or nature-only verses

Write a 36 link kasen-no-renga:

(1) hokku—sets tone, greets all, establishes season, quiets guests to join in
(2) wakiku—builds on unstated elements of the hokku and maintains season. ends in a noun
(3) daisanku—ends with open-ended image (often transitive verb ING)
(5) usually moon shows up here for the first time
(6) concludes the first page (jo) often written by the official scribe
(7)-(29) heats up the links and leaping (intensification)
(13) moon appears again
(17) blossoms usually show up here
(29) moon’s third and final appearance
(30)-(36) kyû—the slow down finale (quiets back down into calmness)
(35) cherry blossoms always here
(36) end with openness and reverberation

Publication fold/design questions?
The paper is folded into 4 panels for each side (cathedral door style).
Panel 1 (outside cover) – title, date, place, copyright, (sometimes authors)
Panel 2 (first fold inside left panel) – first six links
Panel 3 (further inside far left panel) – next six links
Panel 4 (far left inside page panel) – next six links
Panel 5 (right center page panel) – next six links
Panel 6 (far right inside page panel) – next six links
Panel 7 (last fold inside right page panel) – next six links
Panel 8 (back outside cover) – acknowledgments & author links
optional obi (paper belt around the folded renga)

email me your kasen-renga by midnight, Sunday, April 26. and bring one copy to class (properly folded and belted) for sharing in class on April 28

Kasen-renga:

The Changing Seasons by Nic Sanders, Lexy Bieber & Olivia Cuff
Deltas' House Renga
by Kendall Kott, Sarah Smolenski, Izzy Glimco & Paisley Spence
The Pack Leader
by Adam Peters & family
Riding the Wind by Eve Greenwell, Nicole Koch & Mackenzie Peck
Silent Streets
by Francesca & Austyn Krueger
Solo Kasen-renga by Eli Cook
Spring Madness by Kyler Fear, Hallie Allen, Angie Fear & Shalyn Fear
Triumps of Heartbreak by Alex Cardascio & Brandon Januska

Half-kasen "mad-verse" renga (round-robin style beginner's experimental linking):

Adam - Summer
Alex - Mad-verse
Lexy - How Far We Have Come
Austyn - Need Answers
Brandon - Gust of Wind
Eve - Spring Sun
Francesca - Wedding Day
Kyler -
Katelyn -
Kendall - Within the Storm
Nic - Allergic Sneezes
Nicole - Long Meeting
Randy - Back Up

In-class renga:

Midnight Thunder - a renga by the 2015 Global Haiku Class


for 4/30 - final kukai!

(72) final kukai haiku submitted by midnight, Wednesday, April 30 (revisions of any not born in kukai or matching contest)


for 5/5

(73) write about 2 favorites from the final kukai

(74) haiku projects due (to be shared this last day of class). email the contents of your projects (the haiku at least and introduction & photographs or power point, etc) by Midnight, Sunday, May 3

Adam - the sport of haiku
Alex - haiku on being a science student
Austyn - Blue Haiku
Brandon - haiku card game
Eli – haiku on the run
Eve -
Francesca - haiku from the dark side
Katelyn - love haiku
Kendall - snow haiku
Kyler - music covers & haiku
Lexy - choir songs haiku
Nic - piano compositions for haiku
Nicole - softball haiku video


for 5/7 - last day of class

Signature Gift Exchange & Sharing Haiku Collections & Projects

(75) Signature haiku gift exchange (digital photo sent to me) and haiku chapbook collections (email to me) are due Wednesday, May 7.

The signature haiku process—a haiku to give to others when they ask about haiku that can be used to teach them about haiku and to share some of your work with them. A haiku you want to be known for or known by—one that works with a lot of readers. A gift of a haiku insight . . . often presented as a gift of some sort such as a bookmark, a small haiku stone, etc.

BRING 15 copies to class!

(76) Haiku Collection Booklets due: Select and organize your best haiku & senryu & haibun & renga into a collection. Make a little booklet, or print them in a binder, or write them in a blank book.

Select and organize your best haiku & senryu & haibun & renga into a small booklet or collection. Give your collection a title and a © 2015 page. (Often signature haiku are connected to the title.) Include a dedication page if you would like to.

Be sure to write an author's introduction to your collection which explains your title and expresses your approach or why these are the ones you have included in your collection (your poetics preface). Ask a reading partner to write a short introduction to your collection, maybe pointing out one or two favorites—or their observation about something unique about your haiku (the reader's introduction). The reader's introduction should help strangers appreciate and value your collection.

Bring your Haiku Collection to class!

Don't forget to e-mail a copy of the contents of your collection including your introduction to Dr. Brooks by midnight, Wednesday, May 6!

Don't forget to e-mail your short bio statement to Dr. Brooks by midnight, May 6. This bio statement will be used at our Global Haiku final exam Reading.


for 5/14 - final (a haiku reading!)

Final Exam Haiku Reading: 2-4pm, May 14, Kirkland 128

(77) The Spring Global Haiku Reading

I will bring your chapbook collections and return them to you at the final Global Haiku Reading.

Signature haiku book - Dr. Brooks is our host (welcoming everyone & inviting them to sign the signature book)
Refreshments - Eve (cookies)
Publicity & Chalk the walk - Kendall, Nicole, Eve

Extra credit is available for bringing 2 or more guests to the reading, or for helping with one of our haiku reading tasks.

(78) Submissions to Haiku magazines Final. (one email submission copied to me & one snail mail submission brought to the final exam in envelopes)

Type a selection of 5 of your best haiku with your name and address on the upper left hand corner of the page. Also bring an envelope with your name and address in the upper left hand corner. Also include a self addressed envelope with your name and address in both the upper left hand corner and the addressee spot. Include one dollar or two stamps for postage in one of the envelopes. (Many will be submitted to magazines overseas, so please don't stick the stamps on the envelopes.)